Recent Posts

Everyday Red from the Rhône. $12

In recent years at the Domaine les Goubert, daughter Florence has begun to handle more of the winemaking responsibilities. She introduced an extremely popular rosé (sold out) and tweaked a few of their other cuvees. Florence’s addition to the team bodes well for the domaine.

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Condrieu: Nectar of the Northern Rhône

Condrieu is a strong endorsement for the idea of terroir. Grown anywhere else – even 90 minutes south – viognier can be heavy and insipid. But grown in the tiny sliver of an appellation just below Lyon, the grape takes on other-worldly qualities. From a land known for ink-black syrah, Condrieu is the nectar-like exception.

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Sparkling Rosé, Beautiful and Delicious.

It’s amazing how many subconscious visual cues we pick up from a wine’s appearance. Even without smelling it, you would expect a Burgundy and a Côte Rôtie to taste different based on their opacity in a glass. And though it’s certainly not as important as smell, taste, or texture, a wine’s appearance can unquestionably add to its enjoyment. With that in mind we’ll submit the clear winner for our most attractive wine of the summer: the sparkling rosé from Maison Picamelot in Burgundy.

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White Burgundy for Late Summer.

Chablis has always been popular among our customers: it’s refreshing, food-friendly, and well-priced. And while some Chablis is complex and age-worthy, we’re often just as drawn to those that achieve elegance through simplicity. Perhaps our best value from this satellite region in Burgundy is the Domaine Gautheron’s Petit Chablis.

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Sparkling Burgundy: Unexpected and Delightful

Making wine isn’t complicated. Crush a bunch of grapes and sooner or later fermentation will begin. Making good wine, on the other hand, takes skill, experience, and care. In regions like Bordeaux and Champagne, much of the process is mechanized; but in Burgundy, many tasks are still done by hand. Crémant is among the most complicated wines to make...

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A New Discovery in Macon. $22

We returned to the Maconnais region of Burgundy in April, in search of a new winemaker. One morning, after an overlong and disappointing tasting, we found ourselves rushing through back roads to our last idea – no appointment, a cell number and vigneron name on a scrap of paper provided by a friend, and nearly at the non-negotiable mid-day lunch deadline. We nearly called off the search and headed to lunch ourselves.

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A Tale of Two Rivers.

The Ansonia Wines team has been on the move for the last few years, leaving familiar haunts to begin new chapters in far-flung locales. But it’s nice to have a place that will always be home. For us, that’s a cluster of cottages on a remote stream in Northern Pennsylvania. It’s the source of family roots, countless memories, and our company name: Ansonia, PA.

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Stewed Plums and Blackberry Jam.

One of our most popular wines these days has been the Clos Bagatelle Tradition 2012. It’s refreshing, easy to drink, and (most importantly) it’s a bargain. Hailing from the sea of mediocrity that is much of the Languedoc, Bagatelle’s Tradition distinguishes itself with low alcohol and balanced mouthfeel. We have yet to meet someone that doesn’t enjoy it.

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Cider from Bretagne: Advance Order

In France, the idea of terroir is not limited to wine. In our travels there we often find other culinary expressions of place: from Basque country hams, to Belon oysters, to every type of cheese imaginable. It's something the French do particularly well - letting the place dictate the product.

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Sancerre: The Joyful Wine.

Wine writer Lettie Teague describes Sancerre as a wine about “pleasure and not profundity.” And though we’ve certainly had memorable bottles of Sancerre, it’s true that the wine shows a certain joie de vivre – more gourmand than gourmet. For us, a glass of Sancerre calls to mind a large bowl of mussels in a Parisian bistro rather than a Michelin-starred white tablecloth.

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