2010 Saint-Emilion Grand Cru

With Thanksgiving but a few days away, delicious smells have begun to emerge from our kitchen. One of cooking’s most intoxicating aromas comes from a process called the Maillard reaction. First identified by Frenchman Louis Camille Maillard in 1912, it’s the flavor most often associated with browned meat, though it’s also found in bread crusts, chocolate, dark beers, and coffee beans.

A Beautiful New Meursault

Puligny-Montrachet and Meursault are neighboring small towns in Burgundy. From end to end they cover just under five miles, and their combined populations number less than 2000 souls. Both towns have made wine for a thousand years, and today are world famous as sources of the finest white Burgundy.

Extraordinary Premier Cru White Burgundy. $32

It is often said that good wines are made in the vineyards. That may be true, but they can also be saved in the winery. When we visited the Domaine Collet in Chablis in the midst of the 2013 harvest, it seemed a scene of tragedy. Rot-laden grapes and malfunctioning machinery had kept the young winemaker Romain Collet up all night with worry, and we made a mental note to exercise caution before buying the finished product.

Our First Grower Champagne.

For years our readers asked us to find a grower Champagne, and for years our search fell short. But in June we struck gold at last, based on a recommendation from Burgundian winemaker Michel Gros. We’re excited to have filled this hole in our portfolio, and particularly to have done so with such a singular source.

Sparkling Breton Apple Cider. $12.95

Thanksgiving is one of our favorite holidays — a celebration of family, feasting, and maybe some football. We’ve got lots of suggestions for wine on your Thanksgiving dinner table, in our nine mixed cases and November Notebook. But this year we’ll be adding another, more traditional beverage to our table: crisp, refreshing, Breton cider.

Mixed Case: Amiot Red Burgundy Sampler

The tiny Burgundy village of Morey-St-Denis covers just under four tenths of a square mile. It has long played second fiddle to its famous neighbors Chambolle-Musigny and Gevrey-Chambertin, but in fact it holds five Grand Cru vineyards and produces excellent red Burgundies. At their best, the wines of Morey-St. Denis show a beautiful lace-like minerality, and an elegance only possible in Pinot Noir from Burgundy.